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Galway: Mirror pavilions

Galway: Mirror pavilions

John Gerrard’s mirror pavilions are a highlight of the Galway International Arts Festival and Galway 2020. Large 7x7m cube structures, the two pavilions, Corn Work and Leaf Work, are sculptural and light installations clad in highly reflective mirror with a high-resolution LED wall. They are powered by local sustainable energy sources at two sites, Claddagh Quay in Galway and the Derrigimlagh Bog beyond Clifden. Using a technique described as motion matching, Gerrard generates an ongoing infinite choreography, based on the recorded movements of dancers. The two works aim to reflect the history of their locations: agriculture and industry in the city; and in Connemara, the Marconi transmission and later, the Alcock and Brown first transatlantic plane landing.
Claddagh Quay: 2 – 26 September; Derrigimlagh Bog: 10 – 31 October

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Downpatrick: Now and Then

Downpatrick: Now and Then

Former vice-president of the Royal Ulster Academy, John Breakey’s ‘Now and Then’ at the Down Arts Centre consists of a selection of recent watercolours and other paintings and prints. In his eighties, Breakey is well-known for his lithographic work, which combine landscape with abstract forms, creating colourful artworks. His work can be found in several national and international collections.
John Breakey: 4 September – 3 October

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Clonmel: Burke retrospective

Clonmel: Burke retrospective

The South Tipperary Arts Centre is holding a retrospective exhibition of work by sculptor John Burke. Best known for his large-scale steel sculpture, the exhibition showcases maquettes of key projects by the artist, as well as a newly commissioned set of photographs of these works in situ, such as those for NUI Galway and the Bank of Ireland Plaza on Baggot Street.
John Burke: until 20 September

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Austria: Domestic Optimism

Austria: Domestic Optimism

Emma Wolf-Haugh brings her performance piece ‘Domestic Optimism’ to the Grazer Kunstverein Art Gallery in Graz. The work draws on gender, colonialism, the Irish-born designer Eileen Gray and the lesbian experience to subvert historical legacy using vernacular language and aesthetics. Wolf-Haugh is a visual artist and educator and has been artist in residence at IMMA since July 2019. Weaving together her past experience in theatre, installation, performance, publishing and collaborative workshop techniques, she develops work from a queer/feminist perspective.
Emma Wolf-Haugh: 24 September – 20 November

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Dublin: Prodigal Son Restored

Dublin: Prodigal Son Restored

Bartolomé Esteban Murillo (1617–1682) is one of the most celebrated painters of the Spanish Golden Age. A series of six paintings, the parable of the Prodigal Son, was presented to the National Gallery of Ireland by Sir Alfred and Lady Beit in 1987. The Prodigal Son cycle explores sin, repentance and forgiveness across the six paintings, staged in 17th-century Seville, where Murillo was born and lived throughout his life. On view for the first time in thirty years, they have been meticulously restored under the direction of NGI painting conservator Muirne Lydon. Discoveries made during the conservation and research reveal
how the artist worked, from canvas to ground layers and pigments, and form part of the exhibition.
Murillo – The Prodigal Son Restored: until 10 January

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